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Not many people attended so I was among lucky few really to see the films on a big screen, as I don’t think there is many events like this. In fact I have been always on a look out for video art festivals in London but everything seems to have gone digital nowadays (with LUX being an exception on occassions). At Videovada I also attended the Analogue Video Workshop (have been looking for something like it for 7 years!!) and the demonstration of Praxis Live, which was aimed at people who had already experimented with the interactive audio-visual software before.

http://www.ovada.org.uk/videovada/

Max Richter 1921

Bruce Neuman – Clown Torture

Tony Hill – A short history of the Wheel

Ai WeiWei- Dumbass (the music video)

Karen Cytter, Video Art Manual

John Wood and Paul Harrison – The Only Other Point
http://www.carrollfletcher.com/artists/29/works/206/

Dryden Goodwin – Linear

George Barber – Waiting for Dave
http://lux.org.uk/collection/works/waiting-dave

Hito Steyerl – How not to be seen
http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2014/06/18/hito-steyerls-how-not-to-be-seen-a-fucking-didactic-educational-mov-file

Jeremy Deller in collaboration with Jens Petersen (sound designer, Sigur Ross) – English Magic
This was my favourite video, shown on Venice Biennale in 2013
https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/artanddesign/video/2013/may/29/venice-biennale-jeremy-deller-english-magic-video

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( Aura Satz profile on Wire // profile on Southbank )

“Dial Tone Operator” (excerpt ) was a binaural sound sculpture exhibited among other “Mirrorcity” works at Hayward Gallery in London. One which left my imagination activated.

It comprised a display of vintage telephone handsets on a wall at the end of a narrow intimate corridor with just one pair of headphones hanging from a ceiling. To put them on was to tune into a passing frequency just like a Telephone Operator. Aura Satz mixed vintage recordings of telephone sounds with a dial tone, spoken word and electric hun, which also bring to mind all sorts of frequencies that pass through us, whether we are able of picking them up consciously or not.

More information can be found here http://www.iamanagram.com/DialToneOperator.php
[On a side note she also put up a “sister” display called “Dial Tone Drone” outside The Royal Academy in London, outside Picadilly, commissioned by Measure. http://measure.org.uk/exhibitions/telephone/]

“Glissolalia”  (excerpt )played on the acoustic illusion known as the Shepard Scale, a ‘sonic barber’s pole’ (or endless spiral) in which a tone continually rises or falls yet at the same time appears to get no higher or lower. I followed the “exhibition continuous” sign and went down a spiral staircase which soon I discovered led to nowhere. It however tempted the visitor to stay and walk up and down to a very subtle background sound coming out from a very small speakers fitted on the hand-rails. It was composed in collaboration with a musician Aleks Kolkowski. Here is how the piece was described ”
The score starting point is a series of vintage test-tone recordings. These are layered with two other non-human instruments suggestive of vocal quantities – a musical saw and a theremin- and a female Barbershop quartet in which the singing produces overtones that seem to take the human voice beyond itself. The sound layout has been composed as an acoustic spiral, reconfigured to fit the Hayward’s one-way corkscrew staircase. This leads down to the fire-exit, and out into the street.”

“Mirrorcity” theme explores fiction and reality and shows recent works of artists based in London today. Haven’t managed to see all the works before the gallery closed, 2 hours is not enough and the tickets are sadly not transferable to another day.

Info about Lighting:
UK – Manchester- based dbn Lighting are supplied an integrated lighting and visual design plus equipment – including lighting and LED screens – to The Warehouse Project (WHP).
dbn’s Pete Robinson created the production and lighting design for all three rooms in the space.
there is a strip of dbn’s 12.5 mm LED screen 13m wide by 2m deep at the back of the stage flanked either side of the PA wings at front truss level by two vertical LED drops at 1 metre and half a metre wide by 2m deep.
Several panels of LED are mounted on the front truss facing into the audience, and the visual surfaces are completed with a versatile 10 metre wide by one metre deep strip of LED – divided into four sections each mounted on wheeled tank traps – which can be placed onstage in different configurations according to the band or DJ set up.
dbn supplies all the processing, scaling and switching, while the video content for each week is supplied by a third party and/or the performing artists.
The idea is that the LED screen design will work on different perspectives whether you are standing right close up to the stage or right down the far end of the room – there will always be some eye-catching visuals in view.